Lapa and Santa Teresa

  • Lapa and Santa Teresa

Lapa and Santa Teresa

The neighborhood of Santa Teresa came from the convent of the same name in the 18th century. Houses and mansions inspired by the French architecture of the time, many of which are standing until today, were the dwelling of the fortunate of the time. The neighborhood has always been the gateway for many European immigrants. Because of its culture, history and quality of life, Santa Teresa still attracts many artists, intellectuals and scholars. By 1850, the region was heavily populated by the population fleeing the yellow fever epidemic in the city. By staying high, the region was less hit than the other neighborhoods below. In 1872 the streetcar appeared, which became the symbol of the neighborhood. The Santa Teresa cable car runs from 1896, beginning the journey in the center of Rio, passing over the Arcos da Lapa, the former Carioca Aqueduct.


Lapa, which belonged to the center, became the official district of Rio de Janeiro only on May 17, 2012. But its history, and what a history, has come a long time. The cradle of Rio's bohemia, it is also famous for its architecture. Its major geographical reference is the Arcos da Lapa, built to function as an aqueduct in the times of Colonial Brazil. Main work of Rio Antigo and one of the symbols of the city, it has imposing construction in Roman style. It was intended to carry water to the Morro de Santo Antônio. After years of abandonment, degradation and violence, Lapa became an absolute reference for lovers of nightlife. Eclectic and intense, in Lapa all the tribes live in harmony. A musical variety, a lot of street parties, traditional bars and two important stages in the Rio de Janeiro cultural scene (Fundição Progresso and Circo Voador) are part of the life of this Rio neighborhood that breathes joy and diversity.